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Using a combination of nutrients improves early-stage macular degeneration

Jan 04, 2007

This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study looked at the benefit of nutrient supplementation in 106 patients clinically diagnosed with early-stage macular degeneration; the leading cause of blindness in the US. 48 patients were supplemented with Acetyl-L-Carnitine, Coenzyme Q10, and Fish Oil fatty acids and 53 were given placebo for 12 months.

The results were spectacular; in the patients on supplements only one person given the supplements had clinically significant worsening of their vision while 17% of those on placebo suffered with clinically significant vision loss. What?s more, the group on supplements had a significant improvement in vision, a decrease in vision and eye damage, and improved visual sensitivity in the fovea of their macula; this is the central point for fine vision. The supplements also decreased the area covered by drusen; tiny yellowish deposits on the macula that are an early sign of macular degeneration.

An appropriate combination of nutrients may improve and subsequently stabilize vision and eye function and may repair eye damage in patients with early macular degeneration. The study is published in the May-June issue of the international vision journal Ophthalmologica.

Phosphatidylserine supplement reduces stress and improves mood

These researchers report that previous studies show that Phosphatidylserine supplements blunt the release of cortisol; a problematic stress hormone and improve mood during stress (due to exertion). In this study young, mildly neurotic adults were supplemented with Phosphatidylserine 300mg a day (always take this with meals) for a month. The supplement improved their mood and decreased their stressed out feeling. The study performed at the Department of Psychology, University of Wales Swansea in the UK was published in the journal Nutritional neuroscience, 2001;4(3):169-78.