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Two new studies demonstrate the ability of Vitamin D to block breast cancer

Apr 06, 2006

There is a strong relationship between increasing levels of serum vitamin D and an increasingly lower risk of developing breast cancer (the relationship is linear). In a study performed at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto it was found that women who have the highest intake of Vitamin D between the ages of 10 and 29 have an estimated life-long reduced risk of developing breast cancer by 40%. In the second study from the University of California, San Diego, it was found that women who had a serum vitamin D (25-hydroxy Vitamin D) level of 52 nanograms per ml. had a 50% reduction in breast cancer risk. To achieve this serum level women would have to take in about 1,000 IU of Vitamin D daily. Over one million women world wide are diagnosed with breast cancer each year with the highest incidence rates in the US and the Netherlands. The National Cancer Institute estimates that 13% of American women will eventually develop breast cancer. The two studies were just presented at this weeks 97th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Commentary by Jerry Hickey, R.Ph.

Studies show it is not the caffeine which helps decrease the risk of developing diabetes but probably the polyphenols.

Resveratrol may help prevent liver toxicity caused by acetaminophen

In this study mice were given an acetaminophen injection. The acetaminophen caused significant increases in immune chemicals that cause liver inflammation and a surge in free radical activity in the liver and caused damaging immune cells to rush into the liver. Liver enzyme levels significantly increased after receiving acetaminophen. If the mice were given Resveratrol immediately after acetaminophen the rush of damaging-inflammation causing immune cells into the liver was restored back to normal. Free radical levels were reduced back to normal and protective levels of Glutathione were restored. The study is published in the April 1st, 2006 issue of the journal Hepatology Research, the official journal of the Japan Society of Hepatology.