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The risk of dying from invasive breast cancer drops significantly with intake of various food flavonoids

Dec 07, 2007

A growing number of epidemiological studies backed up by laboratory research provide evidence of a reduced risk of suffering with breast cancer if you consume certain classes of flavonoids. This study investigated if the same plant substances also improve survival in women who develop breast cancer and it came to a very promising conclusion.

The study included 1,210 women between the ages of 25 to 98 who were newly diagnosed with invasive breast cancer for the first time. Over the course of the follow-up 113 women died specifically from breast cancer. Both premenopausal and postmenopausal women were protected through the intake of various flavonoids; flavones decreased the risk of dying from any cause and similarly from breast cancer specifically by 37%, Anthocyanidins decreased it by 36%, and isoflavones decreased death risk by 48%.

The collaboration of researchers for this study include those from the University of Toledo in Ohio, the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University, Albert Einstein School of Medicine, and the National Cancer institute. This study is published in the November 1st, 2007 issue of the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention published by the American Association for Cancer Research.

  • Foods that include Anthocyanidins; blueberries, elderberries, raspberries, red grapes, red radishes, red onions, sour red cherries, sweet cherries, (Bilberries contain anthocyanins; a close relative)
  • Foods that include Flavones include; citrus fruits, celeriac, celery and green celery hearts, oregano, dried or fresh parsley, rosemary, thyme

Foods that supply Isoflavones include; Soy and soy foods, red clover, and to a lesser extent peas