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Green Tea Protects from Solar Radiation Damage

Jan 13, 2005

Researchers in the Cornwall Dermatology Research Project studied the ability of EGCG, green teas major antioxidant, and Green Tea itself to protect us from ultraviolet radiation, the type of radiation emitted by the sun. In the first study, human cells were exposed to ultraviolet radiation. Some of the cells were also treated with green tea and others were not. The EGCG decreased radiation damage to DNA in the human cells - this translates to a decreased risk of developing skin cancer. In the second study 10 adult volunteers were exposed to ultraviot radiation and a blood sample was taken. They then consumed 540ml (18 ounces) of Green Tea and blood was again taken. Green Tea consumption decreased damage to DNA caused by ultraviolet radiation. The studies are published in the February 21st, 2005 issue of the journal Photodermatology, Photoimmunity, and Photomedicine.

Elevated Blood Sugar Tied to Dangerous Cancers

An increased risk of major cancers has previously been linked to diabetes. Increased chance of developing pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, and colon-rectal cancer has repeatedly been linked to diabetes. Researchers at Yon Sei University in Seoul conducted a 10-year, forward looking study on 1,298,385 Koreans aged from 30 to 95. Both men and women with high fasting blood glucose levels equal to or greater than 140mg/dl were about 25% more likely to die from cancer than those with normal or low fasting blood glucose. High blood glucose levels were most strongly linked to pancreatic cacer for both sexes. High blood glucose was also linked to cancer in the liver, esophagus, and colon-rectum in men, and cancer of the liver and cervix in women. The higher the level of fasting glucose starting at about 125mg/dl, the greater the risk of developing cancer. The study appears in the January 12th, 2005 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.