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Thinking Outside of the Box for Bone Health

 

bone health

Winter 2019 Catalog

Thinking Outside of the Box for Bone Health

Written by Amanda Williams MD, MPH

Amanda Williams

Director of Nutrition – Boca Raton, Florida
Amanda Williams holds a doctorate in medicine from Xavier University in Aruba, a Masters degree in Public Health from Nova Southeastern University, and a Bachelor's degree in biology from St. Mary's College Orchard Lake. Tune in to Amanda Williams on InVite® Health Radio! Click here for the full listening schedule. Email Amanda: AWilliams@invitehealth.com

Keeping bones strong as you age is a goal we should all have. When you think about how to achieve this, does your mind imagine nutrients such as calcium, phosphorus, vitamin D, magnesium, as well as maintaining your core muscle strength?  Of course these are the obvious choices, but our bones are mysteriously unique in utilizing other nutrients to promote the longevity of our skeleton. If I were to mention vitamin E, fish oil, or even green tea, would you think of bone health? Interestingly enough, you should. These nutrients are also relevant to bone anatomy and physiology

Green Tea for Healthy, Strong Bones

Many are unaware of how green tea can support bone health. That was until Texas Tech University Health Science Center in collaboration with University of Georgia reported on the extensive findings from their research. Bone loss can lead to osteoporosis, which is driven by a few factors, including low hormone levels, oxidative stress and chronic inflammation. Now you may see where we are heading with Green Tea and the role it plays with bone health. Green Tea contains specific polyphenols, including EGCG (Epigallocatechin gallate), that provide significant support to fight the many causes of bone loss. It also supplies antioxidant properties in the support against inflammatory free radicals that otherwise trigger fast loss of bone mineral. Also, Green Tea supports the creation of new osteoblasts (bone building cells) and helps block the activity of osteoclasts (bone removal cells).

Optimizing Bone Health with Vitamin E (Tocotrienol)

Tocotrienol supplementation has been shown to increase bone density by increasing osteoblasts activity, enhancing bone formation, optimizing mineral absorption and decreasing osteoclast driven bone destruction. This is where you might ask, “How is this possible?” The beneficial effects of tocotrienols on bone health have been linked to its antioxidant properties, ability to ease inflammation, but especially down regulating the mevalonate pathway,and by promoting the expression of bone formation genes. When we get into the powerful effects tocotrienols have on the mevalonate pathway (the pathway responsible for regulating new bone formation and bone cell breakdown as well as cholesterol synthesis), a remarkable clinical trial shows that tocotrienols were shown to increase bone density. The benefit of tocotrienols for bone and beyond are extensive. This is why at InVite® Health, we advise adding them to your bone health arsenal.

Omega-3s Role in Supporting Bone Health

There is significant evidence displaying the positive effect that polyunsaturated fats (Omega-3 fatty acids) from Fish Oil, for example, have on bone health. One aspect that has been clearly documented is the ability of Omega 3 fatty acids to inhibit inflammation that leads to bone loss. But a less known yet relevant point is Omega-3 fatty acids are inserted into unique membrane phospholipids called plasmalogens, which have been found to support bone health via a substantial antioxidant role and by maintaining micro architectural structures in bone. Truthfully, Krill Oil is actually more likely to support bone health because it supplies all the makings for plasmalogens in bone structure; fish oils, Choline, and phospholipids.

For the health of your bones think of the famous line from The Wizard of Oz “Lions and tigers and bears, oh my!” and think “Green Tea, Vitamin E and Fish Oil for my bones, oh my!” Thinking outside the box is not a bad thing for your bones!

References

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2. Li W, Zhu S, Li J, et al. EGCG stimulates autophagy and reduces cytoplasmic HMGB1 levels in endotoxin-stimulated macrophages. Biochem Pharmacol. 2011;81(9):1152-63.
3. Hussain, T. , Gupta, S. , Adhami, V. M. and Mukhtar, H. (2005), Green tea constituent epigallocatechin‐3‐gallate selectively inhibits COX‐2 without affecting COX‐1 expression in human prostate carcinoma cells. Int. J. Cancer, 113: 660-669. doi:10.1002/ijc.20629
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8. Ahn KH, Jung HK, Jung SE, et al. Microarray analysis of gene expression during differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells treated with vitamin E in vitro into osteoblasts. Korean Journal of Bone Metabolism. 2011;18(1):23–32
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10. Saif Abdul-Majeed, Norazlina Mohamed and Ima-Nirwana Soelaiman, “A Review on the Use of Statins and Tocotrienols, Individually or in Combination for the Treatment of Osteoporosis”, Current Drug Targets (2013) 14: 1579. https://doi.org/10.2174/13894501113149990193
11. Wall R, Ross RP, Fitzgerald GF, Stanton C. Fatty acids from fish: the anti-inflammatory potential of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids. Nutrition Reviews. 2010;68(5):280–289
12. https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/445177-lions-and-tigers-and-bears-oh-my---dorothy-in