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Low intake of Vitamin E greatly increases the risk of hip fracture in elderly men and women

Dec 10, 2013

Low intake of Vitamin E greatly increases the risk of hip fracture in elderly men and women

Swedish researchers from Uppsala University and the Karolinska Institute have found a connection between low intake of Vitamin E (as d-alpha tocopherol) and weakness of the hip bone. The study included over 61,000 older women and over 1,100 older men.

Over a 19 year period 14,738 women experienced a fracture of a bone with 3,871 of these being hip fractures. A higher rate of hip fracture was tied into low intake of alpha-tocopherol and women within the lowest 20% of intake had an 86% increased risk of hip fracture above the normal rate and a 20% increased risk of fracture at any site.

Taking a supplement that included alpha-tocopherol reduced the risk of hip fracture by 22% below the normal rate for women and a 14% decreased risk of fracture at any site below the norm.

For men low vitamin E intake was an even worse disaster. Over a 12-year period, men in the bottom 80% of alpha tocopherol intake had a stunning 233 % increased risk of hip fracture and an 84% increased risk of fracture at any site compared to men in the highest 20% of intake. The study is published in the January 2014 issue of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.