Due to the site upgrade, your MY ACCOUNT logins will need to be updated. Please access Forgot Your Password to make this change. If you do not have an account, click here.

Curcumin from Turmeric may help allergies

Jan 30, 2007

Over the last few decades there has been a worldwide increase in the percentage of people with allergies and asthma. Curcumin found in the herb Turmeric, a frequently used spice in Asia has anti-inflammatory activity and anti-allergy activity.

In this study mice with an allergy to latex were treated with Curcumin. If the mice were exposed to latex they had an increase in immunoglobulins, and immune system cells that are causative in allergic reactions and asthmatic attacks known as eosinophils. They developed inflammation in their lungs upon exposure. If the mice were supplemented with Curcumin from Turmeric during latex exposure they had a reduction of inflammation in their lungs and a decrease in the inappropriate immune system attack on their lungs and airways. Allergy presenting cells and eosinophil activity was also reduced. The study is published in the January 2007 issue of Clinical and Molecular Allergy.

Early research indicates that the flavone Chrysin may have applications in preventing estrogen dependent cancers

Scientists at the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Buffalo, SUNY, have completed a review of various families of bioflavonoids and found that they are extremely safe and are excellent candidates for cancer prevention. For instance, flavones such as Chrysin inhibit the Aromatase enzyme (CYP19). Aromatase converts androgens into estrogens. They thus decrease estrogen production and produce anti-estrogenic effects, important in the case of prostate cancer and breast cancers. The study is published in the March 2006 issue of Toxicology in Vitro.

Chrysin improves male aging in animal study

Chrysin was administered to aging rats for a 30 day period. The rats given Chrysin had a significant improvement in overall sexual functions compared to rats not given the flavone. The animals had increased libido, increased sperm count, improved ability for fertilization, and greater litter size. The study appears in the Spring 2002 issue of the Journal of Medicinal Foods.